New Study Says Cellphone Related Face Injuries Are On The Rise

Before you read this article, you better place your phone 10 to 20 inches away from your face.

A new study, which was led by a facial plastic surgeon and was published in the JAMA Otolaryngology Journal, showed a huge increase in face injuries caused by smartphones, which are also called as cellphones.

In a severe case, a woman broke her nose after dropping her cellphone on her face.

Dr. Boris Paskhover, who works at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, said he looked at nearly 20 years of research data for the study.

The increase in cellphone related face injuries started to increase in 2006 when Motorola’s and Blackberry’s were still huge.

The report said, “Cell phone-related injuries to the head and neck have increased steeply over the recent 20-year period, with many cases resulting from distraction.”

It added, “Although the disposition of most cases is simple, some injuries bear a risk of long-term complications.”

From 1998 to 2017, nearly 76,000 people got cellphone related injuries.

The data was collected from the emergency room visits of around 100 hospitals in the United States of America.

Until 2006, nearly 2000 cellphone related face injuries were being reported annually.

Most of the injuries were minor.

The injuries that were reported include facial cuts, fractures, and bruises that are the result of careless handling of smartphones.

The report said most of the injuries were the result of texting while walking, which led to tripping and accidents such as landing face-down on the sidewalk.

Another shocking thing that the study found out was that people also reported injuries after getting hit by phones that were thrown at them.

40 percent of the injuries that were caused after getting hit by phones were reported by people who are 13 to 29 years old.

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