Thousands Of “Penis Fish” Wash Up On A Beach In California After Storm Pulled Them From Their Burrows

Thousands of penis fish washed up on a beach in California and pictures show them all over the beach.

The fish, which are known as the fat innkeeper worms or Urechis Caupo, washed up on the beach after a storm hit the Drakes Beach area.

Experts believe that the storm pulled them from their underwater burrows.

The worms were first seen by Ivan Parr, a biologist with the Western Section of the Wildlife Society, on December 6, 2019.

Parr said the 10-inch fat innkeeper worm lives underwater, usually burrowing under mud or sand.

Parr believes the storm pulled them out of their burrows and carried them on the beach.

Parr explained, “I’ve heard my share of imaginative theories from beachcombers, such as flotsam of a wrecked bratwurst freighter.”

He added, “We’re seeing the risk of building your home out of sand. Strong storms — especially during El Niño years — are perfectly capable of laying siege to the intertidal zone, breaking apart the sediments, and leaving their contents stranded on shore.”

Spoonworms are capable of living for up to 25 years. They swim using their spatula-shaped proboscis. Their main food is bacteria, planktons, and small particles present in the see.

Spoonworms eat by using their sticky mucus nets.

Sightings of spoonworms have been confirmed in California’s Moss Landing, Bodega Bay, Pajaro Dunes, and Princeton Harbor.

The penis fish was roaming planet earth nearly 300 million years ago, and the good thing is we humans can eat it.

People who’ve tried eating the penis fish said the fish is chewy, salty, and sweet.

Due to their size and soft bodies, they have many threats, which include humans, sharks, seagulls, and otters.

Scientists say the fish are harmless and are passive creatures.

Sightings of the penis fish have been reported in China, Japan, South Korea, and the United States of America.

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, no, no, it is a penis fish!

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